Mood Swings? Discover Balance.

By Dr. Stephen Center

Mood disorders affect men and women, young and old.  These disturbances are a common complaint of many patients and although many seek treatment, most are left without solutions. Mood disorders are complex – often involving physical and mental ailments that is classically treated with prescriptions. Fortunately, preventive medicine offers the time and opportunity to seek the root of the problem, offering solutions rather than simply treatment. 

Mood disorders can include the obvious symptoms of anxiety, panic attacks and depression or more subtle symptoms, such as fatigue, insomnia, difficulty concentrating and the development of a poor memory. Many times hormone imbalances are to blame from mood swings or erratic moods. Hormones play a significant role in regulating moods and other physiological needs that impact mood, like sleep, stress and libido.

The following is a simple guide for patients to help them understand common associations between hormones and mood. A hormone balance test makes it easy to determine which hormones may be linked to mood disturbance. Vitamin D, adrenal dysfunction, imbalances of the sex hormones and thyroid disorders all contribute to mood and when corrected, often bring freedom to the spirit.

It is critical to have knowledge of your hormone status when experiencing mood problems. This requires salivary or capillary blood testing of the adrenals and sex hormones, as well as a venous blood (regular blood draw) for the thyroid.  Hormone balance, in most cases, is the solution to mood disorders and, fortunately the response is rapid. In the event of a suboptimal response, the neurotransmitters may be nudged into balance through the development of a creative, individualized plan. This process involves dietary changes, detoxification and correction of nutrient deficiencies. It also requires close monitoring and communication between doctor and patient.

On common nutrient deficiency that is linked with mood disorders is vitamin D. Vitamin D – technically a hormone, not a vitamin – is typically associated with depression. Many patients discover a lift in their mood through vitamin D supplementation and efforts to get more sun exposure (as little as 15 to 20 minutes each day.) Sun exposure is the most bioavailable source of vitamin D; however, in areas of the country where the sun does not shine year-round, supplementation is necessary.

Through hormone balance and lifestyle changes, many patients are able to cope with their daily stressors, feel more optimistic about their current and future lives and enjoy an even-temperament.

Contact an expert in preventive medicine and hormone therapy at BodyLogicMD.com.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Comments: 9

(comments are closed)

 
  • […] Mood Swings? Discover Balance. (menopausemaniac.com) […]

     
     
     
  • […] Mood Swings? Discover Balance. (menopausemaniac.com) […]

     
     
     
  • […] Mood Swings? Discover Balance. (menopausemaniac.com) […]

     
     
     
  • […] Mood Swings? Discover Balance. (menopausemaniac.com) […]

     
     
     
  • […] Mood Swings? Discover Balance. (menopausemaniac.com) […]

     
     
     
  • […] Mood Swings? Discover Balance. (menopausemaniac.com) […]

     
     
     
  • […] Mood Swings? Discover Balance. (menopausemaniac.com) […]

     
     
     
  • […] Mood Swings? Discover Balance. (menopausemaniac.com) […]

     
     
     
  • […] Mood Swings? Discover Balance. (menopausemaniac.com) […]