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Cool Jams for Night Sweats?

 

By Renea Cribbs

When it comes to PJs, I am fairly picky. Color doesn’t matter much, but size, fabric and style, matter a lot.  And, I’m not easily swayed by gimmicks. So, when I tried the new moisture-wicking pajamas from Cool Jams, I will have to admit, I was skeptical.

Is there really a set of PJs that can keep me cool on warm Texas nights – especially when night sweats strike?
Nonetheless, I ordered the pants and hemmed them myself. I love the color and the fit – I ordered a large – I’m 5’5” tall with a large bust line. Unlike many pajama tops, these fit me perfectly – plenty of space in the bust, with appropriate fit in the bodice.Initially, I was disappointed to learn that the Cool Jams were not available in capris. For women of a certain age, shorts are rarely to never preferable and pants, well, let’s be honest, I live in Texas and the whole point of this experience is to stay cool. So, pants would never be my option. The site does offer various nightgowns, but nightgowns seem to get twisted as I toss and turn, contributing to sleepless nights. When I buy pajamas, I like capris and I feel a lot of other women might agree with me.

What can I tell you about my experience? Well, not much, since I slept right through it! But, that’s a good thing, right?

The PJs come equipped with a special antibacterial treatment that is said to make the PJ’s odor and bacteria resistant. I awoke refreshed each morning and I assume these features went to work for me throughout the night.

Truly, I don’t recall waking up, kicking off the covers and being a sweaty mess, which has happened to me before. Trust me, any woman that’s experienced hormonal fluctuations in the night knows exactly what I am talking about!

I give the Cool Jams 4 out of 5 stars – I would love to see a capri sold as a separate and then, I would fully endorse this wonderful product!

Do you want to try Cool Jams? Enter to win a free pair or order a set right now at CoolJams.com!

 

Vampire Facelift Buzz

 

Despite what critics and skeptics have hailed as ridiculous and bizarre, the Vampire Facelift  continues to emerge helping thousands reclaim a more youthful appearance – naturally – without downtime or a surgeon’s scalpel.  In fact, since its debut, it has only grown in popularity and its technology is rapidly becoming the cornerstone of a variety of effective rejuvenation techniques.  The Vampire Facelift is not only a segment worth hosting on The Doctors or a prize worthy of the Oscars, it is the beauty secret of some of America’s most beautiful celebrities, including Kim Kardashian and British actress, Anna Friel on Pushing Daisies.

The Vampire Facelift® is a safe and natural procedure for patients seeking aesthetic anti-aging. This revolutionary procedure improves the quality and look of the skin for patients who wish to reduce volume loss, fine lines and textural changes.

Gino, from the Brandmeier Radio Show based out of the windy city of Chicago, recently underwent the procedure. The Brandmeier Show put into perspective that aesthetic treatments are not only for women. Gino saw incredible results with a trained physician by his side.

Watch the video below:

Dr. Lisbeth Roy of Doctors Studio is one of the few certified medical doctors licensed to perform the Vampire Facelift. Dr. Roy recently performed a live demonstration of the procedure at the Blood for Beauty Event at her practice in Fort Lauderdale, as well as was featured as a guest speaker and demonstrator at the South Beach Dermatology Symposium.

To learn about Dr. Roy and Doctors Studio, visit DoctorsStudio.com.

 

The New Perspective on Hormone Replacement Therapy

 

The Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) began in 1991, observing the effects of synthetic hormone therapy on post-menopausal women. The women being studied had suffered from hormone imbalance for 15 years or more. The results, found a dangerous increase in the risk of breast cancer when estrogen and progestin (the synthetic form of progesterone) were combined. Physicians and women, interested in HRT, quickly took a step back, due to fearing the same repercussions.

Almost two decades after the WHI study, there is a light shining at the end of the tunnel. Tobie

de Villers, President of the International Menopause Society, shared with Today.com that when used properly, HRT will offer more benefits than harm. The increased risk of breast cancer, uncovered in the WHI study, has been found to diminish a couple of years after hormone treatments are stopped.

The National Institute of Health reassures women that hormone replacement therapy is safe, as long as it is administered by a medical expert.

Dr. Jen Landa, Chief Medical Officer of BodyLogicMD is thrilled by these new outcomes, “The benefits of HRT have changed the lives of many women suffering from symptoms of menopause. This new research will open the door for many more women. When a woman has all the facts, she can make an informed decision for the betterment of her health and quality of life.”

 

The New Perspective on Hormone Replacement Therapy

 

The Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) began in 1991, observing the effects of synthetic hormone therapy on post-menopausal women. The women being studied had suffered from hormone imbalance for 15 years or more. The results, found a dangerous increase in the risk of breast cancer when estrogen and progestin (the synthetic form of progesterone) were combined. Physicians and women, interested in HRT, quickly took a step back, due to fearing the same repercussions.

Almost two decades after the WHI study, there is a light shining at the end of the tunnel. Tobie

de Villers, President of the International Menopause Society, shared with Today.com that when used properly, HRT will offer more benefits than harm. The increased risk of breast cancer, uncovered in the WHI study, has been found to diminish a couple of years after hormone treatments are stopped.

The National Institute of Health reassures women that hormone replacement therapy is safe, as long as it is administered by a medical expert.

Dr. Jen Landa, Chief Medical Officer of BodyLogicMD is thrilled by these new outcomes, “The benefits of HRT have changed the lives of many women suffering from symptoms of menopause. This new research will open the door for many more women. When a woman has all the facts, she can make an informed decision for the betterment of her health and quality of life.”

 

Got Fatigue? Dr.Oz has the Solutions

by Sofia Radoslovich

Feeling sluggish and tired all the time?
Having difficulty managing your weight?
Trouble sleeping?
Experiencing body aches?

Daily of chronic fatigue produces intense and prolonged stress on the body. Fatigue  affects almost everyone at some point in their life – illness, stressful jobs or a life crisis can drain even the healthiest person of energy. A poor diet, ongoing stress and too little sleep are just a few of the factors that can make you susceptible to fatigue.

America’s most beloved hormone expert, Dr. Jennifer Landa and Dr. Oz have teamed up to present the 4 biggest energy deficiencies in the segment, The Fatigue Solution.  Gluten sensitivities, low iron, iodine, detox and boosting your testosterone levels are just a few of the possible solutions that will help you rid of fatigue for good!

Watch The Fatigue Solution on The Dr. Oz Show on Monday, March 4! Check your local listings for channel and time.

 

The Vampire Facelift Arrives at the Academy Awards

 

by Sofia Radoslovich

Academy Awards Vampire Facelift

The prestige, the glamour, the awards and, let’s not forget what everyone wins – the goodie bags! What could possibly make the Oscars better? Especially when the 2013 Oscars Swag Bag includes the newest in facial rejuvenation, the Vampire Facelift®.

The organic facelift procedure is among the most sought-after gifts found in the Oscars swag bag. Win or lose, celebs like Jennifer Lawrence, Anne Hathaway, Kerry Washington and Jennifer Gardner are now armed with the opportunity to keep their youthful glow forever, painlessly and naturally with the Vampire Facelift®. To recapture your youth in South Florida, the Vampire Facelift® is offered by Dr. Lisbeth Roy of BodyLogicMD of Fort Lauderdale and Doctors Studio.

“The Vampire Facelift® combines Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) and Juvaderm® therapies to artfully turn back the clock to a more youthful you. This procedure is safe and natural for most patients seeking true aesthetic anti-aging. It is the artful placement of Juvaderm® that restores a youthful facial structure, lifting and filling, while the PRP actually anti-ages the skin,” says Dr. Roy. This procedure truly improves the quality and look of the skin by stimulating new collagen, elastin and new blood vessels to return the youthful glow.”

Dr.Roy is one of the few certified medical doctors licensed to perform the Vampire Facelift®. Dr. Roy has eight years of experience with injectable treatments and non-surgical techniques. She is board certified D.O., specially trained and licensed by the creator of the Vampire Facelift®, Dr. Charles Runels. Her experience and training ensure she preserves the quality of the technique behind the Vampire Facelift®.

The Vampire Facelift® is natural. The Juvaderm used in the procedure is bio-identical Hyaluronic Acid. The PRP is 100% organic being that it comes from the you, the patient.

Still not convinced? Witness the Vampire Facelift®, performed by Dr. Lisbeth Roy at her Fort Lauderdale office at the Blood for Beauty Event held on March 7, 2013. Reserve your tickets today – seating is limited! All attendees will be entered to win the Vampire Facelift and other luxurious prizes. Register today at the Blood for Beauty Event site.

 

February is Healthy Heart Month!

 

by Sofia Radoslovich

 

American Heart MonthValentine’s Day is almost here– are you caring for your heart? According to the CDC, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. The most common type of heart condition is coronary heart disease and it occurs when plaque builds up in the arteries that supply blood to the heart. Coronary heart disease causes heart attacks, angina, heart failure and arrhythmia.

Heart disease is preventable and controllable, as long as you follow a plan to reduce your risks. A healthy diet is essential as you begin your journey to prevent heart disease. Make sure to eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables- adults should have five servings per day. Consume foods that are low in saturated fats, trans-fats and cholesterol. Limiting the amount of sodium in your diet will aid in lowering your blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease.

Maintaining a healthy weight and exercising daily will also lower your risk of heart disease. Physical activity has been linked to reduced levels of cholesterol and blood pressure. Make routine appointment to test your cholesterol and monitor your blood pressure. Along with monitoring your blood pressure, it is vital that you do not smoke and limit your alcohol intake.

All of this information can be nerve-racking for many individuals. Strive to make small changes each day toward a healthier lifestyle, as not to become overwhelmed, discourage or stressed – which can further impact stress on the heart. Remember to reward yourself by going for an afternoon walk, taking a yoga class or making a healthy meal with friends. These simple steps can ensure a healthier heart.

 

The Wellness Project: Renee’s Progress

 

Renee Mackey is one of the winners of The Wellness Project, which awarded her a year of wellness from BodyLogicMD. (You can read all about Renee’s journey and see her winning video entry on Renee’s Wellness Project page.)  Last month, Renee had her first appointment with Dr. Heidi Archer of BodyLogicMD of Vail. It has been one month since her treatment plan began. We asked Renee to tell us about her journey this far.

 

Wellness Project

Here is what Renee had to say:

Before going in I was feeling low energy, irritable and overweight.

The most striking thing about my appointment with Dr. Archer was the time spent. We chatted a bit about our lives, about my history and about my current lifestyle. I felt like she was truly interested and saw the value in getting to know me before jumping in with treatment.

Next we went over every single line of my lab work – one by one. I never felt rushed and asked a million questions (this is heaven for me: being able to ask questions without limit.) It was a breath of fresh air to be listened to so attentively and to be able to get so many questions answered. Usually when I leave a doctor’s office, I find that I have more questions than I had when I went in.

We decided – together – to start a small amount of testosterone (mine was tanked), a lower amount of progesterone (this was not as low as expected) and a low dose of Armour® for a borderline low thyroid. I am also taking B vitamins to support my adrenals (which are near collapse) and vitamin D3 (mine was way low.)

I’m thinking some may end up being “bridge” treatments and some may be permanent. My hope is that once my energy level improves, etc., I will be able to be consistent about good diet and exercise and many of these will stabilize in response to that.

I am two weeks into my “protocol” and I am feeling a *bit* better. I feel slightly more energetic and less irritable. Unfortunately fat is not melting off my body by the bucketful as my irrational self would wish, but I know this is not the way of things and is not what I truly expect.

I am reluctant to make any judgments on my improvements until I am through the second half of my menstrual cycle, as that is my most difficult time, typically. I have also not started an exercise program yet, as I want to focus on how I feel with the supplements first and then add in the exercise when everything has had time to sink in.

Thanks so much for this opportunity. I’m looking forward to sharing more positive results soon! 🙂
~Renee

 

How can you begin your journey toward total wellness, like Renee?

Visit BodyLogicMD.com to learn about all the services offered and symptoms treated.  You can find the doctor nearest you by visiting the BodyLogicMD Locations page. If you would like someone to contact you with more information about BodyLogicMD and how the physicians of the BodyLogicMD network can help you live better, longer, click here and fill out the form.

Be certain to join The Wellness Project group Facebook page and follow their journey day-by-day. As a member of the group, you will receive updates as these women take control of their health with the guidance of a physician of BodyLogicMD. You will also be able to share in their journey, ask questions, offer support and witness their transformation.

Experience living better, longer with BodyLogicMD!

 

A Case for Bioidentical Hormones

 

by Dr. Roger Garcia

hormone therapyThere is a lot of confusion and myths propagated about bioidentical hormones and whether they are safer than traditional hormone replacement therapies (HRT).  Bioidentical hormones have been maligned as medications that are unregulated, non-FDA approved and not supported by science.   Perhaps a closer look concerning their use is now in order.

We know that science has demonstrated that the replacement of our hormones brought about by age-related decline will significantly improve the quality of ones life.  The question then becomes whether bioidentical hormones or synthetic hormones should be used to replace our declining levels.

The process of deriving bioidentical hormones from the lab is by definition, a synthetic process but whose final chemical structure is a molecularly exact replica of that found in the human body.  Hence, the term bioidentical.  Traditional hormone medications in contrast are also made through a synthetic process in the lab but with an all-important difference-they are structurally and functionally different from the natural hormones they are attempting to replace.  These hormones are chemically altered to secure patents to protect profits for the pharmaceutical industry as naturally occurring bio-identical hormones by law cannot be patented.

The problem, however, is that the molecular structure determines activity so that even the smallest of changes can completely change the physiologic effect.  This was clearly demonstrated by the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) study of 2002, which tested the effects of Premarin (conjugated equine estrogens) and Provera (medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA)), the most prescribed drug combination hormone replacement therapy for menopausal women at that time.   These drugs while helping with symptoms of menopause through their hormonal mimicry, also interfered with normal physiologic processes, causing a wide variety of adverse effects.  The WHI study was halted because the use of the study drugs, Premarin and Provera (also in PremPro), increased the risk of breast cancer, heart attack, blood clots, and stroke.

The result of this study was not entirely unexpected as this combination has been shown to have precisely these problems.  Studies have consistently shown a decreased risk of breast cancer with natural prescribed progesterone and increased risk with synthetic progestins. (progestins generally refers to synthetic progestogens and a progestogen is the category of hormone molecules, natural and synthetic, that act like progesterone in the uterus).   There are many reasons for this.  Progesterone down-regulates estrogen receptor-1 (ER-1) in the breast, induces breast cancer cell apoptosis (cell death), diminishes breast cell mitotic activity (anti-proliferative and anti-breast cancer effect), and arrests human cancer cells in the GI phase by upregulating cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and downregulating cyclin D1.

The French E3N-EPIC cohort study assessed the risk of breast cancer associated with HRT in 54,548 postmenopausal women and found the risk was significantly greater with HRT containing synthetic progestins than with HRT containing progesterone. This is one reason why progesterone should always be used to balance estrogen independent of the presence or absence of the uterus.

As well, progesterone maintains and augments the cardioprotective effects of estrogen through various mechanisms while MPA does not.  The PEPI trial demonstrated progesterone augments estrogen’s positive effects on lipids while progestins negated these positive effects.  Progestins are also shown to significantly increase the amount of insulin resistance (Type II diabetes) when compared to estrogen alone or estrogen and progesterone. Coronary artery spasm, which increases the risk of heart attack and stroke, can be reduced with estrogen and progesterone but the addition of MPA to estrogen has the opposite effect and results in vasoconstriction. Progesterone was shown to decrease the formation of a protein that initiates athrogenic plaques (coronary artery disease), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, while MPA did not. This is consistent with other studies that showed progesterone by itself or in combination with estrogen, inhibited atherosclerotic plaque formation.  Progestins promoted atherosclerotic plaque formation and prevent the plaque-inhibiting and lipid-lowering actions of estrogen.   MPA was also shown to increase the amount of collagen in vascular plaques, which promotes clot formation increasing the risk of heart attack, stroke and blood clots.

MPA has also been associated with increased fatigue, weight gain, and decrease exercise tolerance, while natural progesterone demonstrates none of these problems.  Progesterone also has numerous beneficial effects on the brain and nervous system, including supporting myelin formation and activating GABA receptors.  Synthetic progestins do not share these physiological effects.  In fact, the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS) found PremPro doubled the risk of developing dementia in women age 65 and older.

Premarin, the most popular estrogen replacement therapy, is derived from pregnant horses’ urine, hence its name, Pre (pregnant)-mar (horse)-in (urine).  It consists of a combination of conjugated equine (horse) estrogens that are more potent and more carcinogenic than other natural estrogens such as estradiol and especially estriol.  4-hydroxyequilenin, is especially potent, 100 times the potency of natural estrogen, and carcinogenic. Many of these foreign estrogens bind very tightly to the human estrogen receptors, making them highly stimulating and carcinogenic. Natural estrogens have no such carcinogenic metabolites. A combination of the natural estrogens, estriol and estradiol have been shown to actually protect against breast cancer and result in a reduction of breast cancer risk. When this is added to natural progesterone’s powerful breast cancer risk reduction, one would expect a significant reduction in breast cancer in women on natural hormone replacement than in women on no therapy.

Finally, all oral estrogens, including Premarin, will increase clotting factors and inflammatory proteins, increasing the risk of clotting, stroke and heart attack. This does not occur with transdermal (topical) estrogens.  Transdermal estradiol, when given with or without oral progesterone, has no detrimental effects on coagulation and no increased risk of thromboembolism (traveling clots).  This is in contrast to an increased risk of thromboembolism with Premarin, with or without synthetic progestin, whether both are given orally (eg, oral estrogen and oral progestin),or whether given as transdermal estrogen and oral synthetic progestin, or whether both estrogen and progestin are given transdermally.

Compounding pharmacies have equally gotten a bum rap.  The argument goes that because they are not overseen by the FDA and their compounded bioidentical formulations are not FDA approved, they are presumed to be unsafe compared to traditional HRT.  The reality is that the federal case, Western States, held that compound pharmacies are not under FDA jurisdiction.Instead, they ARE regulated by the state and local government, usually the board of pharmacy who adopt the standards set by the U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP). The U.S. Pharmacopeia potency regulations require that the active ingredient in all compounded preparations be between 90.0% and 110.0% of the amount stated. Despite this regulation, to avoid questions of potency and/or content uniformity, it is best to use the large national pharmacies that specialize in compounded hormones and are accredited by the Pharmacy Compounding Accreditation Board (PCAB).  Even with these assurances, if one then wishes to avoid compounding, a better choice is to use FDA approved bioidenticals than the use of synthetics.

In addition, bioidentical hormones, like all compounded medications, are made from FDA and USP-registered materials, the same as those used by pharmaceutical manufacturers. The ingredients and their suppliers are regulated by the FDA, with additional oversight by the USP.  Also, compounded medications are in a similar position as manufactured products prescribed for off-label use.  That is, off-label use of manufactured products, which represents a fifth of all prescriptions, although not approved by the FDA for such use, is still commonly prescribed at the discretion of the physician based on experience and clinical results. The same discretion is used for the prescription of compounded bioidentical hormones.

It is beyond the scope of this article to address all the research that has been done on bioidentical hormones.  However, in citing just a few research studies here, it should be obvious that contrary to the claim that bioidenticals are not supported by science, there is substantial scientific and medical evidence that bioidentical hormones are safer and have more efficacious forms of HRT than the commonly used synthetic versions.  More research will be needed to clarify this proposition further and is now presently being conducted.  However, given the state of the art today, the question that must be answered by boomers seeking to improve their quality of life is: Which form of HRT would you rather be treated with?


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Smoking Linked to Cognitive Decline

 

smoking causes brain damage

A study of more than 8,800 smokers over the age of 50 revealed high blood pressure excess weight and cognitive decline. The study tested the study participants at the beginning of the study, four years later and again eight years after the initiation of the study.

The results revealed that not only did the smokers suffer an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, but cognitive decline was also significant – the greatest declines were observed in those with the greatest physical health risks.

Read more: Study Finds Smoking Contributes to Brain Damage